In Memory of Grady Hatton

Former Astros manager Grady Hatton dies at age 90
Associated Press
April 12, 2013


(c) Houston Astros

WARREN, Texas (AP) -- Grady Hatton, the former major league third baseman who managed the Houston Astros in the 1960s, has died. He was 90.

Alyssa Hatton, his granddaughter, says Hatton died Thursday of the effects of old age at his home in Warren, the rural East Texas Piney Woods town that was his home for 40 years.

Hatton hit .254 with 91 home runs and 533 RBIs in 1,312 major league games in 12 seasons from 1946 to 1960 with the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals, Baltimore Orioles and Chicago Cubs. He had a 164-221 record as Houston's manager from 1966-68.

The Beaumont native starred at the University of Texas and served in the U.S. Army during World War II.

A funeral is scheduled for Monday at First Baptist Church of Warren. He will be buried Mount Pisgah Cemetery near Woodville.


Former Astros manager Hatton dies at 90
Brian McTaggert
Astros.com
April 12, 2013

Grady Hatton, who managed the Astros in the late 1960s, has died at the age of 90, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

Alyssa Hatton, his granddaughter, told the AP Hatton died Thursday of the effects of old age at his home in Warren, the small East Texas town where he lived for years. Hatton managed the Astros from 1966-68, compiling a 164-221 record.

Hatton played 12 years in the Major Leagues, hitting .254 for his career with 91 home runs and 533 RBIs for the Reds, White Sox, Red Sox, Cardinals, Orioles and Cubs. He was named to the National League All-Star team in 1952 while with the Reds.

Born in Beaumont, he played baseball at the University of Texas and was a World War II veteran.

A funeral is scheduled for Monday at First Baptist Church of Warren. He will be buried at Mount Pisgah Cemetery near Woodville.


Former Astros manager Hatton dies at 90
Avi Zaleon
Houston Chronicle
April 11, 2013

Grady Hatton Jr. would expect so much of his players that Bob Aspromonte, his third baseman with the Astros, remembers players jokingly asking him, "Well, were you that good a player?"

Of course, they all knew the answer was yes.

The Beaumont native, a 16-year professional baseball player and manager, died Thursday morning of natural causes at his home in the southeast Texas town of Warren. He was 90.

"He was just a solid baseball guy," said Larry Dierker, a pitcher throughout Hatton's 21/2-year tenure as Astros manager from 1966-68. "He knew the game and was fatherly in a lot of ways with the younger guys. Just about anybody you could name in the '60s, from Joe Morgan to Rusty Staub and Bob Watson, nobody is going to say anything bad about Grady Hatton."

Hatton attended Beaumont High School before beginning his collegiate career at the University of Texas. He made his major league debut on April 16, 1946, as a 23-year-old second baseman with the Cincinnati Reds and went on to play for the White Sox, Red Sox, Cardinals, Orioles and Cubs.

In 1952, he was named a National League All-Star.

Following his playing career, Hatton worked his way through the managerial ranks, including stops with the Astros' Class AAA affiliate in Oklahoma City.

"Most of the young players that came up to Houston from Oklahoma City played for Grady, and all of them wanted him to be the major league manager," Dierker said. "They liked him because he was friendly, and they believed in him because they were winning."61 games into the '68 season.

"Whether you win or not, it's not always something the manager can control," Dierker said. "I think some guys were surprised we didn't just take off and start winning, but looking back through the eyes of experience, we probably just weren't ready to win yet."

Hatton's funeral will be at 10 a.m. Monday at First Baptist Church in Warren. Visitation will be 4-6 p.m. Sunday at Riley Funeral Home.